Thursday, November 15, 2018

The sales data from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) shows unit business jet deliveries in 2017 grew slightly last year. The annual databook reported 676 new business jets sold worldwide in 2017 compared to (a revised) 667 unit sales in 2016. The increase was helped by several new models entering full service during the year. Here are some of the highlights and the sales by manufacturer.

Jet cards have been getting a lot of press lately, and with good reason. For the right type of flyer, they can save both money and time. But a private jet card may not be the best option for you. It really depends on your flights, and where you fly, how often you fly and when you fly. In this article, we take a look at jet cards and the various alternatives.

Pilatus announced the development of the PC-12 at the annual National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) convention in October 1989. Pilatus believed that the PC-12 would fit a new market not served by existing aircraft, namely the King Air series aircraft, and it would be the first single-engine, turbo-prop aircraft capable of a large cabin volume, flying at high speed across long distances.

G500

Many of the large fractional jet providers also offer a leasing option. Which one is better for you depends on personal circumstances including investment plans and actual travel needs. SherpaReport talked to some leading providers and advisers to get some different perspectives.

The Dassault Falcon 7X took its first flight in 2005, and was first delivered to a customer in 2007. This large cabin business jet has a range of almost 6,000 nm. Here’s a breakdown on the costs to buy and operate one.

Private jet cards have become increasingly popular. There are a variety of providers who issue the cards and each issuer has somewhat different features. So it is important to spend some time comparing what is available and choosing the one that best suits your needs. Below are some points to consider when purchasing a jet card.

Sales data from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) shows deliveries in 2016 were lower than for several years. The annual databook reported 661 new business jets sold worldwide in 2016 compared to 718 unit sales in 2015. Here are some of the highlights and the sales by manufacturer.

We’ve previously written about the main reasons for flying on private jets. These include the time saving, the privacy, the convenience and the flexibility. Recently we’ve heard of a couple more reasons to add to this list. While these additional reasons don’t make compelling cases on their own, they certainly add to the consideration set.

It always amazes me just how many people are caught out when they make the decision to sell their aircraft, but when you look at the array of specialists offering to support the sales process, it is hardly surprising.

It’s often said that in excess of 80%, as many as 85% perhaps, of all jet sales transactions involve an appointed broker, so my primary focus here is to help guide you through this selection process.

Acquiring your own aircraft takes some thought and planning. If you know what you’re doing and have a good team to help you, the process can go fairly smoothly. But, if you haven’t bought a plane before or if you want to try and “wing it”, you can be in for some exciting surprises. Here’s a look at some of the biggest mistakes that can happen along the way.